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51317--8938-The Influence of Salt Loading Density on the Atmospheric Corrosion of Aluminum

Comparisons with improved data accuracy of installed sensors in lieu of larger quantities of manual spot data are presented. This paper will include the design principles used in the creation of this next-generation platform, end-user input used to refine the design, and recent installation and operational experiences.

Product Number: 51317--8938-SG
Author: Rebecca F. Schaller / Jason M. Taylor / Eric J. Schindelholz
Publication Date: 2017
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 Corrosion of aluminum and aluminum alloys under atmospheric exposure has been well documented for outdoor conditions. While these studies expose the effects of environmental severity they do not explicitly establish the dependence of corrosion rate on salt loading. Accelerated laboratory studies have shown that initial corrosion rates are generally higher with higher salt loadings, but, over time corrosion appears to effectively stifle for low loadings of NaCl (<100 μg/cm2) under fixed humidity conditions. This has previously been attributed to the stability or passivation of the surface that is pH and, in turn, CO2 dependent. Another possible explanation could be the gettering of NaCl by corrosion product leading to surface drying and depletion of the corrosion aggressor. This paper explores the effects of selected NaCl loading densities vs. exposure time of UNS A91100 at both the macro and micro scale to illuminate the possible mechanisms leading to corrosion stifling. Through this work, an understanding of the relationship between corrosion in atmospheric systems versus the variation of a specific environmental severity factor, NaCl loading density, will be further developed.

Key words: Conference papers, 2017 conference papers, Droplets, Corrosion Stifling, Atmospheric Exposures

 

 Corrosion of aluminum and aluminum alloys under atmospheric exposure has been well documented for outdoor conditions. While these studies expose the effects of environmental severity they do not explicitly establish the dependence of corrosion rate on salt loading. Accelerated laboratory studies have shown that initial corrosion rates are generally higher with higher salt loadings, but, over time corrosion appears to effectively stifle for low loadings of NaCl (<100 μg/cm2) under fixed humidity conditions. This has previously been attributed to the stability or passivation of the surface that is pH and, in turn, CO2 dependent. Another possible explanation could be the gettering of NaCl by corrosion product leading to surface drying and depletion of the corrosion aggressor. This paper explores the effects of selected NaCl loading densities vs. exposure time of UNS A91100 at both the macro and micro scale to illuminate the possible mechanisms leading to corrosion stifling. Through this work, an understanding of the relationship between corrosion in atmospheric systems versus the variation of a specific environmental severity factor, NaCl loading density, will be further developed.

Key words: Conference papers, 2017 conference papers, Droplets, Corrosion Stifling, Atmospheric Exposures