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51318-10911-Field Examination of AC Accelerated Corrosion Featured in Monitored Locations

AC current density (rather than voltage alone) should always be the factor considered when assessing susceptibility to AC corrosion. Also presented are analyses used in assessing the metal loss features and the comparison of site-specific data.

Product Number: 51318-10911-SG
Author: Shane Finneran, P.E. / Dr. Dave Norfleet / Lyle Buckingham
Publication Date: 2018
Industry: Energy Generation
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$20.00
$20.00

Field investigation and laboratory analyses were performed reviewing six (6) external metal loss features identified in proximity to HVAC transmission lines and an existing AC coupon test station (CTS) monitoring location. The objective of the assessment was to identify the likely mechanism(s) contributing to the external metal loss features, and asses the variations from the monitored CTS data.

Analysis of the six metal loss features identified evidence indicating that AC corrosion was the most likely mechanism contributing to the metal loss. Additionally, data collected during the site excavations indicated AC current density values near the individual features was significantly greater than reported by the coupon test station as close as 150 feet away.

Common industry feedback is that when induced AC potential is less than “a few volts”, generally cited as 2 VAC or less, that susceptibility to AC corrosion is assumed low. While previous literature has consistently stated the need for considering AC current density, rather than AC voltage alone, there is a noted lack of published evidence of AC corrosion occurring at lower induced potentials, therefore this inaccurate guideline persists. The case study presented has shown that this assumption is not valid, and AC current density should always be the factor considered when assessing susceptibility to AC corrosion. Additionally, this paper presents analyses used in assessing the metal loss features, and the comparison of the site-specific data, as measured from the field and laboratory evaluations to the long-term monitoring data from the nearby CTS.

 

Key Words: AC Corrosion Morphology, AC Current Density, Coupon Monitoring, Direct Examination

Field investigation and laboratory analyses were performed reviewing six (6) external metal loss features identified in proximity to HVAC transmission lines and an existing AC coupon test station (CTS) monitoring location. The objective of the assessment was to identify the likely mechanism(s) contributing to the external metal loss features, and asses the variations from the monitored CTS data.

Analysis of the six metal loss features identified evidence indicating that AC corrosion was the most likely mechanism contributing to the metal loss. Additionally, data collected during the site excavations indicated AC current density values near the individual features was significantly greater than reported by the coupon test station as close as 150 feet away.

Common industry feedback is that when induced AC potential is less than “a few volts”, generally cited as 2 VAC or less, that susceptibility to AC corrosion is assumed low. While previous literature has consistently stated the need for considering AC current density, rather than AC voltage alone, there is a noted lack of published evidence of AC corrosion occurring at lower induced potentials, therefore this inaccurate guideline persists. The case study presented has shown that this assumption is not valid, and AC current density should always be the factor considered when assessing susceptibility to AC corrosion. Additionally, this paper presents analyses used in assessing the metal loss features, and the comparison of the site-specific data, as measured from the field and laboratory evaluations to the long-term monitoring data from the nearby CTS.

 

Key Words: AC Corrosion Morphology, AC Current Density, Coupon Monitoring, Direct Examination

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51315-5594-Requirements of Coupon AC Current Density Affecting AC Corrosion of Buried Steel Pipelines

Product Number: 51315-5594-SG
ISBN: 5594 2015 CP
Author: Fumio Kajiyama
Publication Date: 2015
$20.00