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Assessment of Microbially Influenced Corrosion Threats Using Molecular Microbiological Method

The presence of solids with nutrients that can support the growth of microbial communities may lead to microbially influenced corrosion (MIC) in carbon steel pipelines. This paper examined the microbial diversity of sludges obtained from four (4) different locations of a crude oil transmission system.

 

Product Number: 51317--9384-SG
ISBN: 9384 2017 CP
Author: Tesfaalem Gebremedhin Haile
Publication Date: 2017
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The presence of solids with soluble products and nutrients which can support the growth of microbial communities may lead to microbially influenced corrosion (MIC) in carbon steel pipelines. Many factors affect MIC rates; for example biofilms may secrete enzymes and corrosive chemicals that attack metal alter local acidity and create differential aeration and galvanic cells. Biofilm metabolisms and enzymatic reactions are constantly in flux altering the impact of microorganisms on degradation of metallic materials. Recent research demonstrates that some anaerobic microorganisms catalyse the oxidation of metallic iron and directly consume the electrons with serious consequences in pipeline corrosion.This paper examines the influence of water chemistry pipeline operating conditions and microbiology on the corrosion mechanisms specifically MIC of carbon steel transmission pipelines. Molecular microbiological methods (MMM) were used to characterize sludge samples obtained from Canadian pipeline operators. Furthermore pipeline history (previous presence of MIC mitigation strategies and current sludge sampling practices) along with the operating conditions of the pipelines were collected from the operators to better understand the corrosion mechanisms and help the operators with pipeline integrity management practices.

Key words: MIC, MI-UDC, MMM, Biofilms, Transmission pipeline, Corrosion

The presence of solids with soluble products and nutrients which can support the growth of microbial communities may lead to microbially influenced corrosion (MIC) in carbon steel pipelines. Many factors affect MIC rates; for example biofilms may secrete enzymes and corrosive chemicals that attack metal alter local acidity and create differential aeration and galvanic cells. Biofilm metabolisms and enzymatic reactions are constantly in flux altering the impact of microorganisms on degradation of metallic materials. Recent research demonstrates that some anaerobic microorganisms catalyse the oxidation of metallic iron and directly consume the electrons with serious consequences in pipeline corrosion.This paper examines the influence of water chemistry pipeline operating conditions and microbiology on the corrosion mechanisms specifically MIC of carbon steel transmission pipelines. Molecular microbiological methods (MMM) were used to characterize sludge samples obtained from Canadian pipeline operators. Furthermore pipeline history (previous presence of MIC mitigation strategies and current sludge sampling practices) along with the operating conditions of the pipelines were collected from the operators to better understand the corrosion mechanisms and help the operators with pipeline integrity management practices.

Key words: MIC, MI-UDC, MMM, Biofilms, Transmission pipeline, Corrosion

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