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Picture for Using Simulation to Understand the Difference Between Corrosion in Atmospheric Environments and Chamber Tests
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Using Simulation to Understand the Difference Between Corrosion in Atmospheric Environments and Chamber Tests

Product Number: 51319-13242-SG
Author: Alan Rose
Publication Date: 2019
$20.00

Corrosion in the field manifests over a large timescale so when considering material choices in the design of aerospace systems and subsystems use is often made of accelerated tests such as ASTM B117 salt spray chamber test to rank the possible materials. Even these ‘accelerated’ tests take more than 1000 hours and despite their widespread use are often criticized as a design trade tool since the test environments are considerably different to the expected field environment running the risk of either hiding true corrosion processes or simply being unrealistically challenging for the materials under test.The corrosion community has expended substantial effort in trying to make the tests ‘more realistic’ but in doing so there is considerable debate about whether the tools employed to accelerate the corrosion (thermal cycling high salt concentrations UV exposure etc) actually introduce other corrosion processes that are not even present in the eventual targeted field of operation for the device under test.Computational techniques hold a great deal of promise as a way to understand the effects of different service environments but if the simulations cannot even discern between say an ASTM B117 test and an atmospheric exposure then the simulation results would be of questionable value.The processes involved in corrosion are many and complex however one key parameter is the electrolyte film thickness which will clearly be different whether inside a chamber at high humidity with a continuous supply of sprayed saltwater compared to exposure on a beach where diurnal cycles result in a very thin electrolyte of varying salt concentrations except of course when it is raining!To help designers quickly assess corrosion risk and choose appropriate materials Corrdesa have already developed an electrochemical database of modern alloys and coatings. This has been extended by deconvoluting the polarization data to accurately account for the impact of the actual electrolyte thickness on the oxygen reduction reaction.In this paper using fluid shell elements in a free surface flow formulation we actually predict the variable electrolyte film thickness in a CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) code for a given environmental condition on different test specimens and geometries. The appropriate polarization data for the local electrolyte thickness is then implemented with User Functions in a potential model framework. In this way the galvanic corrosion is simulated for a test device with a more realistic and variable film thickness.The result is that we can dial different test conditions into the simulation such as whether we wish to simulate chamber results or field results cyclic salt fog cyclic humidity (or both).Keywords: Computational Corrosion Analysis Galvanic corrosion prediction FEA corrosion prediction polarization data potential model fluid shell elements CFD

Picture for Validation of Risk Rating Derived from Hydrogen Permeation Field Data with Ultrasonic Inspection Res
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Validation of Risk Rating Derived from Hydrogen Permeation Field Data with Ultrasonic Inspection Results

Product Number: 51315-5926-SG
ISBN: 5926 2015 CP
Author: Moavin Islam
Publication Date: 2015
$20.00
Picture for 97282 Variable Amplitude Galvanostatically
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Variable Amplitude Galvanostatically Modulated Impedance Spectroscopy as a Non-Invasive Tool for Assessing Reactivity at the Corrosion Potential

Product Number: 51300-97282-SG
ISBN: 97282 1997 CP
Author: Paul T. Wojcik, Mark E. Orazem
$20.00
Picture for Variances in Pipeline AC Interference Computational Modelling
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Variances in Pipeline AC Interference Computational Modelling

Product Number: 51319-12985-SG
Author: Gerald Haynes
Publication Date: 2019
$20.00

The AC interference between High Voltage AC (HVAC) power lines and pipelines has been modelled with various software programs all of which have a variety of input data which results in various results and outputs.Important aspects such as the soil resistivity along the pipeline route can have a significant impact on the pipelines coating resistance. This in turn affects both the computed AC voltages and current densities both of which can significantly affect personal safety and corrosion of the pipeline.Therefore the spacing between these field measurements along the pipeline route can have a significant effect on the pipeline integrity. Soil resistivity measurements collected every 1000ft versus every 5280ft (1 mile) can have a dire consequence on the corrosion results and the matter is exacerbated where these soil resistivity measurement values change significantly along the route. The accuracy of the soil resistivity field data relative to the actual routing (wetlands rivers low and high resistivity’s etc.) will also affect the correct placement of the AC Mitigation (grounding) as well as the resistance of the grounding which in turn has a cost implication to the asset owners and/or operators.Other aspects such as the power line LEF/EMF may also be used to “calibrate” the AC Interference especially where load data is absent.This paper addresses the critical importance of collecting adequate data for the AC Interference studies to prevent costly installations and to mitigate the incorrect positioning of AC Mitigation systems due to inadequate information.

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Water Chemistry Impacts on Cooling Water System Iron Oxide Dispersants

Product Number: 51315-5996-SG
ISBN: 5996 2015 CP
Author: Zahid Amjad
Publication Date: 2015
$20.00
Picture for What’s Wrong With ASTM G48 Qualification Test in Duplex SS Welds?
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What’s Wrong With ASTM G48 Qualification Test in Duplex SS Welds?

Product Number: 51319-13118-SG
Author: Marco De Marco
Publication Date: 2019
$20.00

The application of Corrosion Resistant Alloys (CRA) in harsh environments and severe services is gaining a leading position across the Industry. Among the different CRA Duplex & Superduplex stainless steels (DSS) represent an often-interesting choice in terms of cost-benefit ratio. Duplex and superduplex stainless steels as a matter of fact offer a competitive cost excellent corrosion resistance in many environments and good mechanical properties; they are often replacing and upgrading traditional stainless steels by closing the application gap with more noble alloys such as nickel and copper alloys. The quality control of DSS fabrications that involve welded joints cannot underestimate the possible influence of the welding process itself on the localized corrosion resistance of the material. Such alloys are characterized by a somewhat complex metallurgy which involves during welding the possible precipitation of undesirable phases & compounds that can induce an important loss of corrosion resistance in particular considering localized corrosion phenomena (e.g. pitting corrosion).During welding and materials qualification steps the most commonly specified test for checking localized corrosion resistance of CRA in particular in chloride-containing environments is the Ferric chloride ASTM G48 [1] corrosion test. So many End-User material & fabrication specifications have taken up this procedure by incorporating it and often customizing it. This is because the procedure described in the ASTM standard does not cover or define in detail many particular aspects of the test itself. This creates a number of free interpretations of the test procedure that can be associated with more or less severe test conditions and more or less easy-to-reach requirements. It can be useful to remember that the test itself is in any case not a real fitness for purpose test but more a quality control one; it is carried out under very severe conditions often more severe than the actual conditions in which components will be exposed. This also means that even small variations in the test procedure welding variables or welding metallurgy can tip the balance in the pass/fail equilibrium. The purpose of this work is to describe some fundamental aspects of test procedure and results evaluation somehow customizable with respect to the ASTM standard which may influence the test outcome itself also considering a possible review of the standard toward a more unified procedure. In this context taking into account that manufacturers find themselves in need to optimize the welding process with the aim to overcome G48 corrosion test during qualification the work also describes typical issues related to welding that could induce a negative verdict of ferric chloride pitting test.

Picture for Wrought CuNi30Cr2 (CNC) a New Concept for a Corrosion Resistant Copper Alloy
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