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CorrCompilations: Underdeposit Corrosion (E-Book)

Underdeposit corrosion (UDC) has been recognized by the oil and gas industry as a major threat to the integrity matrix of the production and transportation of oil and gas and has frequently been blamed for high corrosion rates and loss of containment during operations.

The content of this NACE International CorrCompilation: Underdeposit Corrosion covers a wide range of topics that were assembled to help the reader better understand and assess UDC threat, determine the corrosion mechanism(s) responsible for the UDC, and adopt the appropriate mitigation strategies to target the active corrosion mechanism(s). The topics include proper identification and characterization of the deposits encountered in oil and gas production and transportation systems; laboratory UDC testing methods to determine responsible UDC corrosion mechanism(s) and evaluate inhibitor performance; UDC threat assessment through modeling and prediction of solids transport and settling; Internal Corrosion Direct Assessment (ICDA) methods as a means to assess UDC threat; identifying and applying appropriate UDC preventive and mitigative strategies; and finally, case studies to elucidate real examples of how UDC was identified and managed.

2019 NACE E-Book

Product Number: 37644-E
ISBN: 978-1-57590-385-9
Author: A.M. El-Sherik
Publication Date: 2019
$81.25
$125.00
$125.00

Underdeposit corrosion (UDC) has been recognized by the oil and gas industry as a major threat to the integrity matrix of the production and transportation of oil and gas and has frequently been blamed for high corrosion rates and loss of containment during operations.

UDC is a localized form of corrosion attack that occurs beneath or around deposits/solids that accumulate and settle on the metal surface. The deposits encountered in the oil and gas industry are very diverse in nature. They can be organic (e.g., wax and asphaltene), inorganic (e.g., mineral scales, sand, clay, corrosion products, and salts), or biofilm. In all cases, water has to be part of these solids for corrosion to occur. The encountered deposits can also be complex and intermingled mixtures of water, organic, inorganic, and biomass. The type of deposit that is present on the metal surface will affect the corrosion mechanism and severity of the UDC corrosion. Therefore, an effective mitigation strategy relies on understanding the nature of the deposit that is present.

Underdeposit corrosion is most prevalent in dead legs and low flow/intermittent flow pipelines. During periods of low or no flow, the sediment and water transported in these systems can form deposits/solids by settling to the bottom of the pipe, which can lead to UDC. The deposits also interfere with the chemical inhibition of UDC by reducing the available concentration of the corrosion inhibitor’s active components reaching the metal surface as a result of their preferential adsorption onto the solids. The deposits act as a physical barrier to the transport of the inhibitor’s molecules, thus depriving the metal surface of the effective inhibitor concentration.

The content of this NACE International CorrCompilation: Underdeposit Corrosion covers a wide range of topics that were assembled to help the reader better understand and assess UDC threat, determine the corrosion mechanism(s) responsible for the UDC, and adopt the appropriate mitigation strategies to target the active corrosion mechanism(s). The topics include proper identification and characterization of the deposits encountered in oil and gas production and transportation systems; laboratory UDC testing methods to determine responsible UDC corrosion mechanism(s) and evaluate inhibitor performance; UDC threat assessment through modeling and prediction of solids transport and settling; Internal Corrosion Direct Assessment (ICDA) methods as a means to assess UDC threat; identifying and applying appropriate UDC preventive and mitigative strategies; and finally, case studies to elucidate real examples of how UDC was identified and managed.

2019 NACE E-Book

Underdeposit corrosion (UDC) has been recognized by the oil and gas industry as a major threat to the integrity matrix of the production and transportation of oil and gas and has frequently been blamed for high corrosion rates and loss of containment during operations.

UDC is a localized form of corrosion attack that occurs beneath or around deposits/solids that accumulate and settle on the metal surface. The deposits encountered in the oil and gas industry are very diverse in nature. They can be organic (e.g., wax and asphaltene), inorganic (e.g., mineral scales, sand, clay, corrosion products, and salts), or biofilm. In all cases, water has to be part of these solids for corrosion to occur. The encountered deposits can also be complex and intermingled mixtures of water, organic, inorganic, and biomass. The type of deposit that is present on the metal surface will affect the corrosion mechanism and severity of the UDC corrosion. Therefore, an effective mitigation strategy relies on understanding the nature of the deposit that is present.

Underdeposit corrosion is most prevalent in dead legs and low flow/intermittent flow pipelines. During periods of low or no flow, the sediment and water transported in these systems can form deposits/solids by settling to the bottom of the pipe, which can lead to UDC. The deposits also interfere with the chemical inhibition of UDC by reducing the available concentration of the corrosion inhibitor’s active components reaching the metal surface as a result of their preferential adsorption onto the solids. The deposits act as a physical barrier to the transport of the inhibitor’s molecules, thus depriving the metal surface of the effective inhibitor concentration.

The content of this NACE International CorrCompilation: Underdeposit Corrosion covers a wide range of topics that were assembled to help the reader better understand and assess UDC threat, determine the corrosion mechanism(s) responsible for the UDC, and adopt the appropriate mitigation strategies to target the active corrosion mechanism(s). The topics include proper identification and characterization of the deposits encountered in oil and gas production and transportation systems; laboratory UDC testing methods to determine responsible UDC corrosion mechanism(s) and evaluate inhibitor performance; UDC threat assessment through modeling and prediction of solids transport and settling; Internal Corrosion Direct Assessment (ICDA) methods as a means to assess UDC threat; identifying and applying appropriate UDC preventive and mitigative strategies; and finally, case studies to elucidate real examples of how UDC was identified and managed.

2019 NACE E-Book

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