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51318-10838-Evaluation of MIC research in UST under the influence of biodiesel

Some 1,401 underground diesel storage tanks were analyzed for average maximum pit depths over the years 2003 till 2016. The results showed that since the addition of biodiesel the average pit depth increased due to Microbiologically Influenced Corrosion (MIC).

Product Number: 51318-10838-SG
Author: Elsemiek Croese / Walter de Koning / Leon Overduin / Sabine Doddema / Leo van Kuijl / Van der Heide /
Publication Date: 2018
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Starting in 2007 the regulations in the Netherlands state that renewable fuel has to be added to fossil diesel in the context of energy and climate policy. At present, the statutory rate designed to be 7%. Despite the sympathetic image of the use of bio-components, it also has important disadvantages with relation to corrosion for underground steel storage tanks (USTs) which are uncoated and therefore vulnerable for corrosion. This paper describes the results from a current study in which historical data of 1,401 USTs were analyzed for average maximum pit depths over the years 2003 till 2016. Furthermore tank sludge and wall samples from two tanks were analyzed using Next Generation Sequencing to identify microorganisms, to test the hypothesis that MIC has played a role in the formation of the pitting corrosion defects in USTs. The results showed that since the addition of biodiesel the average pit depth increased. The microbial data showed that MIC was likely involved in the formation of the pits and that sampling location is extremely relevant for analysis of MIC. The data also revealed that analysis on the most common MIC suspected microorganisms like sulphate reducing bacteria might not be a sufficient target for USTs.

Key words: biodiesel; Microbial Influenced Corrosion (MIC); corrosion; underground storage tanks (USTs); Molecular Microbiological Methods (MMM); history data.

 

Starting in 2007 the regulations in the Netherlands state that renewable fuel has to be added to fossil diesel in the context of energy and climate policy. At present, the statutory rate designed to be 7%. Despite the sympathetic image of the use of bio-components, it also has important disadvantages with relation to corrosion for underground steel storage tanks (USTs) which are uncoated and therefore vulnerable for corrosion. This paper describes the results from a current study in which historical data of 1,401 USTs were analyzed for average maximum pit depths over the years 2003 till 2016. Furthermore tank sludge and wall samples from two tanks were analyzed using Next Generation Sequencing to identify microorganisms, to test the hypothesis that MIC has played a role in the formation of the pitting corrosion defects in USTs. The results showed that since the addition of biodiesel the average pit depth increased. The microbial data showed that MIC was likely involved in the formation of the pits and that sampling location is extremely relevant for analysis of MIC. The data also revealed that analysis on the most common MIC suspected microorganisms like sulphate reducing bacteria might not be a sufficient target for USTs.

Key words: biodiesel; Microbial Influenced Corrosion (MIC); corrosion; underground storage tanks (USTs); Molecular Microbiological Methods (MMM); history data.

 

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