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51316-7102-In-Situ Monitoring Of Bacteria Under High Pressure And Temperature Conditions

A preliminary evaluation of the use of Surface Enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) to monitor Biofilm. SERS was used to monitor the growth of Desulfovibrio vulgaris and Desulfovibrio desulfuricans on UNS S30400 stainless steel samples in-situ from pre-inoculation through the initial hours of growth at 37 °C and atmospheric pressure.

Product Number: 51316-7102-SG
ISBN: 7102 2016 CP
Author: Todd Mintz
Publication Date: 2016
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Microbial induced corrosion (MIC) is a phenomenon where by microorganisms presence and activities result in the degradation of a material or component. In particular for the oil and gas industry various bacteria such as sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) acid producing bacteria general aerobic bacteria and general anaerobic bacteria have been linked to accelerated corrosion. While MIC may be attributed to a single group of organisms MIC is more severe when the population in a biofilm contains many types of microorganisms. There has been a lot of research focused on identifying the key microorganisms that control corrosion in oil and gas pipelines. Much of this work includes bioassays of the microorganism followed by metagenomics. While this may be successful at identifying the microorganisms present in the biofilm it does not provide in-situ data on how the bacteria may be contributing to the pipeline corrosion. In order to accomplish this an in-situ technique needs to be developed. The work described in the paper examines how Surface Enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) was used to evaluate two different strains of SRBs in-situ. SERS was used to monitor the growth ofD. vulgaris and D. desulfuricans on stainless steel samples in-situ from pre-inoculation through the initial hours of growth at 37 °C and atmospheric pressure. The results showed distinct spectra that could be attributed to the growth of the SRB on the surface of the stainless steel samples. Furthermore the SERS results showed that there were differences between the spectral patterns of the two SRBs that could be used to differentiate the two SRBs. Finally testing was conducted in a gas flow loop at a pressure of 1000psi and temperature of 37°C to mimic conditions that might be experienced in a gas pipeline.D. vulgaris was grown in this gas flow loop and in-situ SERS measurements were made on the surface of a stainless steel sample contained in the flow loop. The high pressure and temperature SERS results appeared to indicate growth ofD.vulgaris on the exposed stainless steel sample.

Keywords: Downloadable, Microbial induced corrosion, Surface Enhanced Raman, In-Situ Characterization, SRB

Microbial induced corrosion (MIC) is a phenomenon where by microorganisms presence and activities result in the degradation of a material or component. In particular for the oil and gas industry various bacteria such as sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) acid producing bacteria general aerobic bacteria and general anaerobic bacteria have been linked to accelerated corrosion. While MIC may be attributed to a single group of organisms MIC is more severe when the population in a biofilm contains many types of microorganisms. There has been a lot of research focused on identifying the key microorganisms that control corrosion in oil and gas pipelines. Much of this work includes bioassays of the microorganism followed by metagenomics. While this may be successful at identifying the microorganisms present in the biofilm it does not provide in-situ data on how the bacteria may be contributing to the pipeline corrosion. In order to accomplish this an in-situ technique needs to be developed. The work described in the paper examines how Surface Enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) was used to evaluate two different strains of SRBs in-situ. SERS was used to monitor the growth ofD. vulgaris and D. desulfuricans on stainless steel samples in-situ from pre-inoculation through the initial hours of growth at 37 °C and atmospheric pressure. The results showed distinct spectra that could be attributed to the growth of the SRB on the surface of the stainless steel samples. Furthermore the SERS results showed that there were differences between the spectral patterns of the two SRBs that could be used to differentiate the two SRBs. Finally testing was conducted in a gas flow loop at a pressure of 1000psi and temperature of 37°C to mimic conditions that might be experienced in a gas pipeline.D. vulgaris was grown in this gas flow loop and in-situ SERS measurements were made on the surface of a stainless steel sample contained in the flow loop. The high pressure and temperature SERS results appeared to indicate growth ofD.vulgaris on the exposed stainless steel sample.

Keywords: Downloadable, Microbial induced corrosion, Surface Enhanced Raman, In-Situ Characterization, SRB

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Product Number: 51314-3755-SG
ISBN: 3755 2014 CP
Author: Yves Gunaltun
Publication Date: 2014
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