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51317--9689-Inhibition of Pitting Corrosion in Simulated Liquid Radioactive Waste

The Hanford Site in Richland, WA stores liquid radioactive waste in underground, carbon steel tanks. Electrochemical corrosion testing was performed to determine new limits that optimize the chemistry control, yet are robust enough to inhibit against the possibility of increased concentrations of aggressive species.

 

Product Number: 51317--9689-SG
ISBN: 9689 2017 CP
Author: Bruce Wiersma
Publication Date: 2017
Industry: Energy Generation
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The Hanford Site in Richland WA stores liquid radioactive waste in underground carbon steel double shell tanks (DSTs). The DSTs have a well-defined chemistry control program for the prevention of stress corrosion cracking general corrosion and pitting of the steel that is exposed to the waste. The primary aggressive species active in the localized mechanism is nitrate while hydroxide and nitrite are utilized to inhibit these mechanisms. Recent tests suggested that the corrosion control program requirements may be optimized so that the total amount of inhibitor necessary may be reduced. Secondly future waste streams that will be transferred into the tanks may include other aggressive species (e.g. chloride and sulfate) at higher than previously experienced concentrations. Electrochemical corrosion testing was performed to determine new limits that optimize the chemistry control yet are robust enough to inhibit against the possibility of increased concentrations of aggressive species.

Key words: radioactive waste, carbon steel, pitting corrosion, electrochemical testing

The Hanford Site in Richland WA stores liquid radioactive waste in underground carbon steel double shell tanks (DSTs). The DSTs have a well-defined chemistry control program for the prevention of stress corrosion cracking general corrosion and pitting of the steel that is exposed to the waste. The primary aggressive species active in the localized mechanism is nitrate while hydroxide and nitrite are utilized to inhibit these mechanisms. Recent tests suggested that the corrosion control program requirements may be optimized so that the total amount of inhibitor necessary may be reduced. Secondly future waste streams that will be transferred into the tanks may include other aggressive species (e.g. chloride and sulfate) at higher than previously experienced concentrations. Electrochemical corrosion testing was performed to determine new limits that optimize the chemistry control yet are robust enough to inhibit against the possibility of increased concentrations of aggressive species.

Key words: radioactive waste, carbon steel, pitting corrosion, electrochemical testing

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