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51318-11594-Modeling of Solid Deposition Limit Velocity in Liquid Pipelines

Review of relevant solids deposition models available in literature, including the model proposed in NACE SP0208-20081 and presents results from Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations for heavy and light oil in straight and bent pipelines.

Product Number: 51318-11594-SG
Author: Teresa Leung / Jenny Been / Yannick Beauregard / James Chow
Publication Date: 2018
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$20.00
$20.00

Internal corrosion in liquid petroleum pipelines is most likely to occur in areas where water and solid particles accumulate. Proper management of this threat requires an understanding of the fluid properties and flow conditions that allow for water accumulation and the sedimentation of solid particles. This paper reviews relevant solids deposition models available in literature, including the model proposed in NACE SP0208-20081 and presents results from Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations for heavy and light oil in straight and bent pipelines. It was found that the empirical and mechanistic models from literature predict a wide range of particle settling velocities and that some models are in better agreement with each other as well as with CFD simulations. CFD simulations for horizontal pipelines show that particle deposition in heavy oil occurs more readily than in light oil. This is driven by differences in velocity profile of the pipe flow and the Reynold's number rather than by individual fluid properties, e.g., viscosity. Particle deposition in overbends, an area of concern for pipeline operators, was also examined by CFD. The results show that, the presence of the recirculating zone, i.e. low velocity region, immediately downstream of an overbend causes more pronounced particle deposition in heavy oil than in light oil.

 Key words: internal corrosion, oil pipeline sediments, under-deposit corrosion (UDC), NACE SP 0208-2008

Internal corrosion in liquid petroleum pipelines is most likely to occur in areas where water and solid particles accumulate. Proper management of this threat requires an understanding of the fluid properties and flow conditions that allow for water accumulation and the sedimentation of solid particles. This paper reviews relevant solids deposition models available in literature, including the model proposed in NACE SP0208-20081 and presents results from Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations for heavy and light oil in straight and bent pipelines. It was found that the empirical and mechanistic models from literature predict a wide range of particle settling velocities and that some models are in better agreement with each other as well as with CFD simulations. CFD simulations for horizontal pipelines show that particle deposition in heavy oil occurs more readily than in light oil. This is driven by differences in velocity profile of the pipe flow and the Reynold's number rather than by individual fluid properties, e.g., viscosity. Particle deposition in overbends, an area of concern for pipeline operators, was also examined by CFD. The results show that, the presence of the recirculating zone, i.e. low velocity region, immediately downstream of an overbend causes more pronounced particle deposition in heavy oil than in light oil.

 Key words: internal corrosion, oil pipeline sediments, under-deposit corrosion (UDC), NACE SP 0208-2008

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51318-11630-Internal Corrosion Direct Assessment of a Wet Gas Pipeline

Product Number: 51318-11630-SG
Author: Xihua S. He / Debashis Basu / and Osvaldo Pensado / Jianyun Mei / Bibo Zhang / Hongbo Wu / Yongzhao Fan / Deqiang Cai / Yang Li
Publication Date: 2018
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