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51317--9719-New Yellow Metal Corrosion Inhibitors Targeting Surface Chemistry of Industrial Systems

It has been shown that when calcium and phosphate, used with an oxidizing agent that the two inhibiting mechanisms, calcium phosphate and azole, compete for the surface. By identifying the surface chemistry, new inhibitors were developed to target surface chemistry of yellow metals.

Product Number: 51317--9719-SG
ISBN: 9719 2017 CP
Author: Paul Frail
Publication Date: 2017
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Phosphate is the most common inhibitor used in industrial waters for iron surfaces. When it combines with the calcium calcium phosphate colloids form in solution and then form a cathodic passivation film on top of iron oxide layer. Surface analysis was used to exam chemical composition and the formation process. It was found that the dispersant polymer used to control scale inhibition plays a significant role in the calcium phosphate passivation mechanism for iron surfaces. Azoles have long been used in industry to protect yellow metal surfaces and are believed to form a metal-organic polymer on the surface. Recent results have shown that when calcium and phosphate are used in junction with an oxidizing agent that the two inhibiting mechanisms calcium phosphate and azole compete for the surface. By identifying the surface chemistry a new array of inhibitors was developed to target surface chemistry of the yellow metal surface. This approach allows for the design of more efficient inhibitors that work with the water chemistry are halogen stable are potentially more environmentally friendly and extend the treatable limits of current azole chemistries. Beaker tests recirculating tests and pilot testing were performed to compare new inhibitors performance capabilities versus standard industrial azoles (benzotriazole tolyltriazole and chloro-tolytriazole) under a variety of industrial conditions that include elevated chlorides (~1000 ppm as chloride) and hyperchlorination (>0.5 ppm free residual chloride).

 

Key words: Benzotriazole, Tolyltriazole, Butyl Benzotriazole, Azole, Corrosion, Copper, Surface Analysis, Electrochemistry, XPS, and ToF-SIMS

Phosphate is the most common inhibitor used in industrial waters for iron surfaces. When it combines with the calcium calcium phosphate colloids form in solution and then form a cathodic passivation film on top of iron oxide layer. Surface analysis was used to exam chemical composition and the formation process. It was found that the dispersant polymer used to control scale inhibition plays a significant role in the calcium phosphate passivation mechanism for iron surfaces. Azoles have long been used in industry to protect yellow metal surfaces and are believed to form a metal-organic polymer on the surface. Recent results have shown that when calcium and phosphate are used in junction with an oxidizing agent that the two inhibiting mechanisms calcium phosphate and azole compete for the surface. By identifying the surface chemistry a new array of inhibitors was developed to target surface chemistry of the yellow metal surface. This approach allows for the design of more efficient inhibitors that work with the water chemistry are halogen stable are potentially more environmentally friendly and extend the treatable limits of current azole chemistries. Beaker tests recirculating tests and pilot testing were performed to compare new inhibitors performance capabilities versus standard industrial azoles (benzotriazole tolyltriazole and chloro-tolytriazole) under a variety of industrial conditions that include elevated chlorides (~1000 ppm as chloride) and hyperchlorination (>0.5 ppm free residual chloride).

 

Key words: Benzotriazole, Tolyltriazole, Butyl Benzotriazole, Azole, Corrosion, Copper, Surface Analysis, Electrochemistry, XPS, and ToF-SIMS

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