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RP0173-HD1973-SG, Collection and Identification of Corrosion Products-HD 1973

This recommended practice provides guidelines which are applicable to most situations in which corrosion products are to be collected and analyzed. Historical document 1973

Product Number: 53014-HD1973
Author: NACE
Publication Date: 1973
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1.1 This recommended practice provides guidelines which are applicable to most situations in which corrosion products are to be collected and analyzed. Because the person collecting a sample of corrosion products in the field may have had no previous experience in handling corrosion problems, this standard explains the procedures that should be followed in order to provide the laboratory with valid samples whose examination and analysis can contribute to the solution of the corrosion problem.

1.2 Because most analyses of corrosion products are conducted in the laboratory and not by the person collecting the corrosion product samples in the field, this standard describes some of the analysis and identification procedures to guide the engineer in his discussions with the analyst in the laboratory.

1.3 If the corrosion problem encountered is new or unusual, it is strongly recommended that before any samples are taken, the laboratory that will perform the identification or analysis be contacted for any special instructions that may be applicable to the particular corrosion problem.

1.4 Corrosion products can in certain cases cause injury by contact with skin and eyes, inhalation of dusts or released vapors, radiation exposure, etc., so that appropriate precautions are necessary both in sampling and subsequent handling by analytical personnel. Those samples of corrosion products either known or suspected of containing harmful substances should be suitably identified to reduce risk of injury. Certain corrosion products are pyrophoric in nature and will release heat or burst into flame in contact with air. This not only can be a safety problem but can cause change in chemical composition leading to improper interpretation of analytical results.   Historical document 1973

1.1 This recommended practice provides guidelines which are applicable to most situations in which corrosion products are to be collected and analyzed. Because the person collecting a sample of corrosion products in the field may have had no previous experience in handling corrosion problems, this standard explains the procedures that should be followed in order to provide the laboratory with valid samples whose examination and analysis can contribute to the solution of the corrosion problem.

1.2 Because most analyses of corrosion products are conducted in the laboratory and not by the person collecting the corrosion product samples in the field, this standard describes some of the analysis and identification procedures to guide the engineer in his discussions with the analyst in the laboratory.

1.3 If the corrosion problem encountered is new or unusual, it is strongly recommended that before any samples are taken, the laboratory that will perform the identification or analysis be contacted for any special instructions that may be applicable to the particular corrosion problem.

1.4 Corrosion products can in certain cases cause injury by contact with skin and eyes, inhalation of dusts or released vapors, radiation exposure, etc., so that appropriate precautions are necessary both in sampling and subsequent handling by analytical personnel. Those samples of corrosion products either known or suspected of containing harmful substances should be suitably identified to reduce risk of injury. Certain corrosion products are pyrophoric in nature and will release heat or burst into flame in contact with air. This not only can be a safety problem but can cause change in chemical composition leading to improper interpretation of analytical results.   Historical document 1973